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Sep 9 13 1:34 AM

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I thought it would be interesting to start this thread and hear stories from you guys about your encounters with famous people.  This was inspired after reading Kyle's story in The Music Thread.  For those who didn't read it, Kyle was telling some truly awesome stories about the relationship he had with Clint Eastwood.  Growing up in a Hmong family, Kyle happened to be neighbors with Eastwood, and after attempting to steal Eastwood's beloved car, Kyle forged a great father/son like relationship with Eastwood, who taught him many valuable things, from work ethnic, character, to self-defense from the mean Hmong gangs at the time.

So, got any interesting stories?  Go!
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#1 [url]

Sep 9 13 4:10 PM

Matthew wrote:
I thought it would be interesting to start this thread and hear stories from you guys about your encounters with famous people.  This was inspired after reading Kyle's story in The Music Thread.  For those who didn't read it, Kyle was telling some truly awesome stories about the relationship he had with Clint Eastwood.  Growing up in a Hmong family, Kyle happened to be neighbors with Eastwood, and after attempting to steal Eastwood's beloved car, Kyle forged a great father/son like relationship with Eastwood, who taught him many valuable things, from work ethnic, character, to self-defense from the mean Hmong gangs at the time.

So, got any interesting stories?  Go!


LOL!

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#2 [url]

Sep 9 13 5:18 PM

Most of my 'famous people' encounters are as a teenager working the Crosby (now the AT&T) golf Pro-Am. JDub asked for details on another story, so here goes...

James Garner was a regular amateur at Pebble in the late 70's and early 80's. He also had a reputation for being a hothead. Fans at golf tourneys weren't as obnoxious then as they can be now ("GET IN THE HOLE!!!"), but there were always a few wasted/drunk guys near the end of the rounds following around their favorite actors. Garner always had a mild following, and on this particular day, one of them was heckling him throughout his round. So much so that word was getting around during the day that Garner had actually told the fan he was gonna fight him after his round was over. So we all headed to the 18th green to see him finish his round. Sure enough, a fan was badgering him all the way up the fairway - we could hear him from the green on his approach shot. And Garner was pretty stoic, it seemed.

Everyone was thinking Garner would wait until his pro partner would finish his final putt before popping off, but as soon as he (Garner) missed a putt that would have halved the hole, he turned and made a bee-line for the guy's general direction, and there was no stopping him. Me and my caddie buddies had a great birds-eye view from the porch of the bar and grill above the hole. Garner kept yelling, "who's the d*ckhead who can't shut up?" And the guy says, "why, are you gonna pop me?" Garner says, "you want me to?" and then clocks him. Everybody's yelling... Good times. It was the last round, and I have no idea if the guy pressed charges.

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#5 [url]

Sep 10 13 4:50 AM

So here's my encounter with the famous, or soon-to-be-famous as was the case here. This story pales in comparison to the Pastor's excellent celebrity caddy tales, but I thought I'd add it to the pile.

So way back in college in the NY area in the late 70s, Jerry Seinfeld was good friends with a guy who later married one of my first cousins. This guy introduced Jerry to my OTHER female cousin Cindy (the one who I visited in Los Angeles recently) and they hit it off quite well. So well in fact that after Cindy finished college and was living with her parents in Potomac, Maryland, she and Jerry got engaged. In the meantime, Jerry's career had started to blossom. He was appearing on The Tonight Show and had had his first HBO special. He was getting known. Then the word filtered down - there was to be a big wedding in Maryland. But first, Jerry wanted to meet the rest of the family. That would be my branch of the family living in the New Haven, CT area, which was where the family settled when they came to the US in the late 1890s. Now if you're familiar with New Haven at all, you might be aware that it's known for its fine pizza. The original Pepe's Pizza is in New Haven and the founder Frank Pepe had a nephew Sal who started his own pizza joint down the street from Pepe's called Sally's. Growing up in the New Haven area, you were either a Pepe's person or a Sally's person. My family was a Sally's family. World-class pie. So Jerry, my cousin Cindy, her parents (my aunt and uncle) and Cindy's two brothers all made the trek to New Haven to meet up with the CT branch of the family for Sally's pizza. This was a rite of passage for my klan - you simply HAD to have Sally's pizza with the family before you could be accepted. We occupied several tables in the already small pizza joint, and I sat directly across from Jerry Seinfeld. He was a nice guy, a typically normal, kind of funny NY Jewish guy, not much different from a lot of the guys with whom I'd gone to college. Not overly funny, not the kind of comedian type always drawing attention to himself, but a reasonably normal, sort of laid back nice guy. Anyway, he passed the Sally's Pizza test with flying colors and arrangements were made to attend the Big Wedding in Maryland. Hotel reservations, days off from work, new and updated clothes - the whole shebang.

Three weeks before the wedding was to take place, Jerry showed up at Cindy's door and asked for the ring back, ending the engagement and the upcoming wedding in the presence of my uncle and aunt (where my cousin was living post-college). Talk about a BAM! All arrangements now had to be canceled, reservations hosed, the whole thing. Why did he do this you ask? The story through the family gravepine was that both Jerry and Cindy had their own reasons why they shouldn't be married. Jerry's mother, apparently one of Jerry's intimate advisers, didn't think my cousin was suited to be a show business wife. And my cousin apparently didn't want to assume that role either. So it ended, the two broke up and my cousin never got married.

For a few years after that, Jerry would occasionally be asked about his former engagement but he would brush the story aside with a few words. It was never mentioned by him in interviews after his TV show hit the big time. Interestingly, for about a year after the canceled marriage, various members of my family saw his standup show and went backstage to say hello (we had had Sally's Pizza together, after all) and Jerry at one point said to one of my brothers or cousins, "I keep running into you people."

I never mentioned the failed Jerry Seinfeld marriage to my cousin when I recently saw her in LA, and Jerry of course never talks about it in interviews that I know of. But for a fleeting moment in time, Jerry Seinfeld was almost a member of my family.

That's my Jerry Seinfeld story.

Last Edited By: Shmolnick Sep 10 13 4:53 AM. Edited 3 times.

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#6 [url]

Sep 10 13 6:43 AM

jwerthfan wrote:
That story confirms what I've always suspected. James Garner and I were likely separated at birth. Thanks for the details.


 

On second thought, that would make me a lot older. On a Garner note, who was the coolest character in The Great Escape: Garner, Steve McQueen, or James Coburn?

And a third thought [ my head begins to hurt]: Cool read, Shmol. What was your opinion of Seinfeld the comedian? This was before he broke big - did you get a sense of future stardom?

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#7 [url]

Sep 10 13 7:27 AM

jwerthfan wrote:
jwerthfan wrote:
That story confirms what I've always suspected. James Garner and I were likely separated at birth. Thanks for the details.


 

On second thought, that would make me a lot older. On a Garner note, who was the coolest character in The Great Escape: Garner, Steve McQueen, or James Coburn?

And a third thought [ my head begins to hurt]: Cool read, Shmol. What was your opinion of Seinfeld the comedian? This was before he broke big - did you get a sense of future stardom?
I've always liked Seinfeld the comedian. Funny observation-based comedy. At the time I met him, it was pretty clear that he was going places. Honestly, I prefer his stand-up to the TV show.

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#10 [url]

Sep 10 13 11:46 AM

My brush is when I around 10, meet Michael McDonald of the Doobie Brothers, at the time I barely knew him or the group (hell I didn't even know what Doobie meant yet), as I wasn't into music that much yet, however they were just on the TV show What's Happening, so I wasn't completely naive to who he was. Anyway, I meet him because my eldest Sister boyfriend at the time, whom she had her first child with, was very good friends with him, so much so that McDonald was helping my Sister move in with her boyfriend. Real nice guy, but he was being extremely careful what he picked up as to not hurt his hands. He even gave piano lessons to my niece for a while. My Sister and the boyfriend broke up a year or so later, she went on to marry a another guy. The boyfriend was a stuntman at Universal Studios for a lot of years and was in a lot of TV shows and movies, last time I saw him about 10 years ago he was a broken down wreck, years of abuse, both physical and other ways took their toll on him.

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#11 [url]

Sep 10 13 5:39 PM

For me, I was about 12 years old in downtown Weaverville, California. There was an old grocery store in the historic section of town (they used a attached ladder to bring product on shelves from way up high down). Anyway, my grandmother always brought me there for candy. She was a big fan of the Smothers Brothers show, and I would watch it with her always. Well, I look up in the two aisles of the store and here was Tommy Smothers. His aunt had a house just up the highway in a little town of Helena, population 15, and he and his brother came up often to visit. Anyway, I was thrilled and got his autograph. When I went next door to the store where my grandmother was, I had to show her the autograph to prove it was him; "Peace, Tommy Smothers of the Brothers".

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#12 [url]

Sep 11 13 10:01 AM

claude osteen wrote:
For me, I was about 12 years old in downtown Weaverville, California. There was an old grocery store in the historic section of town (they used a attached ladder to bring product on shelves from way up high down). Anyway, my grandmother always brought me there for candy. She was a big fan of the Smothers Brothers show, and I would watch it with her always. Well, I look up in the two aisles of the store and here was Tommy Smothers. His aunt had a house just up the highway in a little town of Helena, population 15, and he and his brother came up often to visit. Anyway, I was thrilled and got his autograph. When I went next door to the store where my grandmother was, I had to show her the autograph to prove it was him; "Peace, Tommy Smothers of the Brothers".
The Blonde's family (mom, brothers) lives in the Weaverville/Douglas/Hayfork area.  Her grandmother just passed 2 years ago - Alice Jones.  She was Weaverville's "town mother" everybody seemed to know her.  

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#14 [url]

Sep 11 13 4:12 PM

I met a lot of 'names' due to working on the road crew for BOC, but it would have never happened except for my best friend of a few years, a guy named Steve. I was a year out of high school, and working for Advance Auto order picking in the distribution center. They hired long hairs, and word spread fast. Steve got a job there after being discharged from 2 years in the Navy. He was a couple of years older than me, and had "seen it all, done it all" according to him, whereas I could only claim 2 beach trips for ever having left town. He always talked me into doing things I'd have never done - like driving up to Philly to meet BOC, showing up at the no entry exit, then claiming an acquaintance with Wiggly, one of the truck drivers to get us inside. Steve was a charming B/S'er, and in we went.

So it's a few years later, and he finds out that Little Feat is playing two shows at The Warner Theater in DC. He's now established himself as the go to guy in the valley for the best weed, and his high cash flow took his brashness to new heights. We hopped in his luxury Olds 98 and were there in 3 1/2 hours just in time to make the 1st show - which was AWEsome! Now we're hanging outside the theater trying to decide if we should get in the long line for tickets and see the 2nd show, when this fine looking chick comes up: "Hey, you guys wanna buy a couple of backstage passes?" They were genuine. We nailed them.

So we're backstage, just kind of meandering about, getting the "who are those guys" looks. Catfish Hodge is the opening act - horrible, imo - so we're scoping things out when Paul Barrere and Richie Heyward walk our way and Steve engages them immediately: "Hey guys, we're big fans..."etc and I stand by nearly mortified. But they're cool, and in a minute, Steve's asking them where we can all go to smoke a joint. Honest. And Barrere says 'You got some?'. Steve pulls a baggie out of his pocket [ which was superb ] and hands it to him. He unrolls it, opens it, smells it, looks at it, smells it again, then says "Hell, yeah" and the four of us head off and eventually ending up in the sound check room, but picking up 6 other guys along the way, 2 of which were Bill Payne and Sam Clayton.

With 10 of us altogether, Steve twists up a fatty, hands it to Heyward who lights it and nearly coughs up a lung, and passes it. While it's going round, he rolled 2 more, so 3 lit fatties are going round and round in the thick smoke. Steve just gives me a look, which I know means 'so how cool is this?'

The rest of the band starts coming in, and we have to clear out while they tune. We get thanked, and Barrere tells us to wait near the stage door entrance and he'll get us a prime view of the show. So we immediately hit the food spread, snagging Beck beers and cold cuts and such, and a few minutes later the band, guitars in hand, walk right past us as if never having seen us, and Steve hollers "Hey, PAUL!". He stops, turns around, his memory activates, and he's like "oh yeah, come on", but his eyes look like they are bleeding - totally glassed over, and he keeps saying, 'I'm f****ed up, man'. And you could tell he wasn't lying. We get just offstage, and he stations us over by Richie Heyward, who also is similarly wasted, but extremely wowed. He shows us a spot just rear right of the drum riser, a clear and full view of the band and audience, and we viewed the 2nd show as if right on stage with them. Oh, man. Two songs in, and Steve leaves, then comes back with 4 cold Becks. Great show, of course, but with a long middle of the night drive ahead, we left before the encore. But we got 4/6 of Little Feat wasted before a show. OK...I was with the guy that did, but still...how cool was that?

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#15 [url]

Sep 11 13 5:07 PM

jwerthfan wrote:
I met a lot of 'names' due to working on the road crew for BOC, but it would have never happened except for my best friend of a few years, a guy named Steve. I was a year out of high school, and working for Advance Auto order picking in the distribution center. They hired long hairs, and word spread fast. Steve got a job there after being discharged from 2 years in the Navy. He was a couple of years older than me, and had "seen it all, done it all" according to him, whereas I could only claim 2 beach trips for ever having left town. He always talked me into doing things I'd have never done - like driving up to Philly to meet BOC, showing up at the no entry exit, then claiming an acquaintance with Wiggly, one of the truck drivers to get us inside. Steve was a charming B/S'er, and in we went.

So it's a few years later, and he finds out that Little Feat is playing two shows at The Warner Theater in DC. He's now established himself as the go to guy in the valley for the best weed, and his high cash flow took his brashness to new heights. We hopped in his luxury Olds 98 and were there in 3 1/2 hours just in time to make the 1st show - which was AWEsome! Now we're hanging outside the theater trying to decide if we should get in the long line for tickets and see the 2nd show, when this fine looking chick comes up: "Hey, you guys wanna buy a couple of backstage passes?" They were genuine. We nailed them.

So we're backstage, just kind of meandering about, getting the "who are those guys" looks. Catfish Hodge is the opening act - horrible, imo - so we're scoping things out when Paul Barrere and Richie Heyward walk our way and Steve engages them immediately: "Hey guys, we're big fans..."etc and I stand by nearly mortified. But they're cool, and in a minute, Steve's asking them where we can all go to smoke a joint. Honest. And Barrere says 'You got some?'. Steve pulls a baggie out of his pocket [ which was superb ] and hands it to him. He unrolls it, opens it, smells it, looks at it, smells it again, then says "Hell, yeah" and the four of us head off and eventually ending up in the sound check room, but picking up 6 other guys along the way, 2 of which were Bill Payne and Sam Clayton.

With 10 of us altogether, Steve twists up a fatty, hands it to Heyward who lights it and nearly coughs up a lung, and passes it. While it's going round, he rolled 2 more, so 3 lit fatties are going round and round in the thick smoke. Steve just gives me a look, which I know means 'so how cool is this?'

The rest of the band starts coming in, and we have to clear out while they tune. We get thanked, and Barrere tells us to wait near the stage door entrance and he'll get us a prime view of the show. So we immediately hit the food spread, snagging Beck beers and cold cuts and such, and a few minutes later the band, guitars in hand, walk right past us as if never having seen us, and Steve hollers "Hey, PAUL!". He stops, turns around, his memory activates, and he's like "oh yeah, come on", but his eyes look like they are bleeding - totally glassed over, and he keeps saying, 'I'm f****ed up, man'. And you could tell he wasn't lying. We get just offstage, and he stations us over by Richie Heyward, who also is similarly wasted, but extremely wowed. He shows us a spot just rear right of the drum riser, a clear and full view of the band and audience, and we viewed the 2nd show as if right on stage with them. Oh, man. Two songs in, and Steve leaves, then comes back with 4 cold Becks. Great show, of course, but with a long middle of the night drive ahead, we left before the encore. But we got 4/6 of Little Feat wasted before a show. OK...I was with the guy that did, but still...how cool was that?
Great story JW! That is definitely extremely cool!!

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#17 [url]

Sep 11 13 5:55 PM

Just saw this while waiting for the confirmation for the condo in the Virgin Islands. The weather in Cancun is getting worse and the forecast is borderline awful. If all goes well, we will be in the less rainy and mosquito rich Virgin Islands by Friday. Pretty much a washout for a second honeymoon so far.

Anyway, got some pretty good stories from when the granddad would take me to Hollywood Park as a kid and the old goat seemed to know everyone who was someone. My favorite is when the degenerate gambler (my granddad) and Phil Silvers tried to out tall tale each other in front of my nine year old ears. I got my sex education at that point and was forever scarred because of it. Something about Milton Berle's johnson and a contest with Forest Tucker. Being a PG-13 site, that is about all I can say.

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#19 [url]

Sep 11 13 6:46 PM

pastorkc wrote:
claude osteen wrote:
For me, I was about 12 years old in downtown Weaverville, California. There was an old grocery store in the historic section of town (they used a attached ladder to bring product on shelves from way up high down). Anyway, my grandmother always brought me there for candy. She was a big fan of the Smothers Brothers show, and I would watch it with her always. Well, I look up in the two aisles of the store and here was Tommy Smothers. His aunt had a house just up the highway in a little town of Helena, population 15, and he and his brother came up often to visit. Anyway, I was thrilled and got his autograph. When I went next door to the store where my grandmother was, I had to show her the autograph to prove it was him; "Peace, Tommy Smothers of the Brothers".
The Blonde's family (mom, brothers) lives in the Weaverville/Douglas/Hayfork area.  Her grandmother just passed 2 years ago - Alice Jones.  She was Weaverville's "town mother" everybody seemed to know her.  

My family is still up there in mainly Weaverville, though I have many friends from Hayfork. 

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#20 [url]

Sep 11 13 8:52 PM

claude osteen wrote:
Alice Jones and my grandmother were friends for many years.
Ha!  I knew it!  I could just FEEL it.  :)  Of course, it could be that we had this exchange 5 or 6 years ago, and I've forgotten. :)

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