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Oct 23 15 10:38 AM

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There are a lot of interesting choices out there.  Let's do a poll!  And after you vote, write a post about why you think your choice is the best choice.

Who is your #1 guy? (Result)

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#1 [url]

Oct 23 15 10:40 AM

I'm going with Dave Martinez. Bench coach under Maddon for EIGHT YEARS? Yes, please. While Kapler is intriguing, Martinez' experience puts him over the top for me. Not to mention his close ties with Friedman.

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#2 [url]

Oct 23 15 11:09 AM

I'm torn between Martinez and Kapler. Can I vote for both? :) I voted for Kapler because I'm thinking since he's big on the analytical stuff and the front office is big on the analytical stuff, they might mesh better?

Then again... What the hell do I know?!?!

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#3 [url]

Oct 23 15 11:18 AM

monsooner wrote:
I'm going with Dave Martinez. Bench coach under Maddon for EIGHT YEARS? Yes, please. While Kapler is intriguing, Martinez' experience puts him over the top for me. Not to mention his close ties with Friedman.
Completely agree with Kyle here. I want someone with experience in the Show. While Martinez hasn't actually managed in the Show, he's been Maddon's bench coach, so that's almost as good. We don't need another manager who needs to learn on the job--that's what the minors are for.

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#4 [url]

Oct 23 15 11:38 AM

The more I think about it the more I like Roenicke for the job. He has experience, he is a great teacher and communicator and he values analytics. Let Kapler be his bench coach and if Honeycutt is not coming back, bring in Mike Maddux as pitching coach.

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#5 [url]

Oct 23 15 12:08 PM

I think I'd probably give it to Wallach. My hesitation is he stood right next to Mattingly so long some of his "talent" may have rubbed off. I really don't think I've even heard Martinez or Kapler speak even once so have no clue how bright they are. I'd eliminate Dusty as a fossil and have heard enough bad things about Geren and Roenike to eliminate them too. I don't think it's a good idea for a guy to play with a team one year and manage the same guys a year later so I'd eliminate AJ. To me that leaves Wallach or Black.

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#6 [url]

Oct 23 15 12:08 PM

I voted Martinez. MLB experience as bench coach, plus being Bilingual I think will be a plus for certain players. But franly I don't have any qualms over any of the favorites, and wouldn't even mind seeing out of the box thinking of AJ Ellis at least getting an interview.

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#7 [url]

Oct 23 15 12:18 PM

I went for Kapler. He's tight with the FO and that means they will likely be united in how they build and manage the team. That's a good thing. Plus Kapler is a fellow Nice Jewish Boy!

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#9 [url]

Oct 23 15 1:37 PM

This is always such a tough question, because none of us really tracks managerial prospects. I like Acta, but the lack of success and reports of him losing clubhouses are red flags. I like Martinez, but why has it taken him so long to get a damn job? I like what I hear about Kapler and I think someone on the younger side is better suited to our youth movement, but he's super inexperienced. I'd love a Martinez/Kapler combo, but that's unlikely and a mostly untenable situation. All said, I'd go with Kapler, because he seems like he's smart enough and well-liked enough to be able to figure it out quickly. If he's truly such a gem, no use letting him get away while we give a re-tread their 2nd, 3rd or 4th shot ...

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#10 [url]

Oct 23 15 2:14 PM

I voted for Tim Wallach because he is the biggest man of the listed candidates, and could do a Walt Alston "get off the bus challenge" and take on anybody who doesn't toe the line. Well, not really, but I do like Wallach a lot. Only problem is that when everybody starts ragging on him about an in-game decision, I might get defensive.

I always respected Bud Black when he managed SD, but not sure he's the right one. Kapler and Martinez need managerial experience and MLB is not the place for on the-job-training? As far as Baker and Geren, that ship has sailed. I'd like to have Roenicke back as third base coach, because I can't remember a single bad decision he made in that capacity. AJ is too much one of the guys to be considered.

One other candidate mentioned who I do NOT want is Alex Cora. Never liked him as a player and would hate him as a manager.

I think Kapler has the inside track, but wouldn't rule out Bo Porter or even Chili Davis, Manny Acta, or Sandy Alomar, Jr.

Here are a couple of guys with Dodger backgrounds who may be too old school, but could perhaps add a spark: Bobby Valentine (I know, he's not a candidate) and Brett Butler.

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#11 [url]

Oct 23 15 2:23 PM

For the next two years, I'd prefer Martinez or Acta as manager and Kapler as the bench coach.  Then, from 2018 onward, I'd prefer Kapler to manage and Martinez or Acta to bench.  Obviously, this scenario would not happen out of respect to both Martinez or Acta.  So, I voted for Kapler as manager and Martinez/Acta as bench coach in 2016, with the hope that Kapler assimilates quickly.  My vote is more of an investment, really.


Then again, Martinez or Acta could prove to be wonderful at the helm.  [insert shrug emoticon]

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#12 [url]

Oct 23 15 2:23 PM

From an article just posted on the LA Times website:

From the time Kapler became the Dodgers' farm director, there were rumblings within the organization that he might be the front office's handpicked manager-in-waiting. True or not, this perception could present an obstacle for Kapler if he is selected to manage the team. If players see him as an extension of the front office, they could view him with suspicion.

Already, Kapler has raised some eyebrows with the Dodgers.

He was responsible for introducing organic food and eliminating soda from the team's dining room in spring training, a move that was unpopular with veteran players.

Kapler also authors a blog about nutrition and fitness. In August, he used the platform to encourage baseball players to expose their private parts to sunlight as a method of increasing testosterone production.


Suggesting the players should expose their private parts to sunlight might even be more noteworthy than having a wife named Beetlejuice.

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#13 [url]

Oct 23 15 2:54 PM

beefchopper wrote:


Kapler also authors a blog about nutrition and fitness. In August, he used the platform to encourage baseball players to expose their private parts to sunlight as a method of increasing testosterone production.

If Kapler is manager it might be quite a sight to look into the Dodgers dugout any time it is facing into the sun.

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#14 [url]

Oct 23 15 3:41 PM

beefchopper wrote:

beefchopper wrote:


Kapler also authors a blog about nutrition and fitness. In August, he used the platform to encourage baseball players to expose their private parts to sunlight as a method of increasing testosterone production.

 

If Kapler is manager it might be quite a sight to look into the Dodgers dugout any time it is facing into the sun.

I wonder which player would use "My Ding-a-ling" as his walk up song?

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#16 [url]

Oct 23 15 3:54 PM

beefchopper wrote:

beefchopper wrote:


Kapler also authors a blog about nutrition and fitness. In August, he used the platform to encourage baseball players to expose their private parts to sunlight as a method of increasing testosterone production.

 

If Kapler is manager it might be quite a sight to look into the Dodgers dugout any time it is facing into the sun.

Damn, I may need a new pair of glasses and an Ultra High Def TV. 

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#17 [url]

Oct 23 15 10:36 PM

While I shared in everyone's frustration about Mattingly, sadly, a lot of the moves that he made that frustrated us to no end are probably done by about 90% of other MLB managers.  The problem isn't so much Mattingly in a vacuum, but the horrid philosophies that have permated baseball, particularly over the past 30 years, from the save, to LaRussa bullpen micromanagement.  Bring in a closer in a tie ballgame, instead of worrying about a save?  Most managers sadly leave their closer hanging; ask Fredi Gonzalez in the 2013 NLDS.  It's going to have to take a real gutsy guy, willing to free himself from some of the past, with the support of the FO, to really turn something like that on its heels.  

This is why I've come around to Kapler, lately.  Oddly, his inexperience is appealing in that he hasn't been indoctrinated with "the book" and how things are supposed to be done.  He wrote this article a couple of years ago that I thought was pretty good: http://www.foxsports.com/mlb/just-a-bit-outside/story/new-competitive-edge-in-baseball-091114

By all accounts, he's quite willing to F with the system and get really creative.  That's something I always felt was really Maddon's best quality.  I like Maddon, but I think he's overrated in the sense that people think he's this crazy genius.  Really, what makes Maddon great is that he's willing to get creative and make decisions that sometimes goes against what "the book" says.  Sometimes it works, a lot of times it doesn't, but it's that openness to ideas that's really his best strength.  He's, at the very least, curious, and that's a great thing to have in a manager, and I think Kapler has that.  I'm not trying to discount experience, it's quite valuable, but not if it's being experienced in making robotic, generic, crappy decisions.  Although, for better or worse, experience is something that's increasingly decreasing in importance, with the FO taking on larger roles in decisions.

Which brings me to the next point: whoever it is, the next Dodgers manager has to be on board with analytics.  But what I think is equally important, beyond having those tools, is being able to effectively communicate these philosophies to players and show why these tools are better, both for clubhouse cohesiveness and for the next manager not appearing as a puppet.  I think Kapler could be quite effective in that regard, having been a former player and, at one time, being on the other side of that debate.  After last year, he's also one of the few people who have really great, personal insights into the Seager's, and Schebler's of the world, something that will become more important as they and others continue to get promoted.

What actually scares me about Kapler is that, at times, he almost comes across as a parody.  The organic eating stuff is all well and good, and more power to him, but, unless he wants to piss off a clubhouse pretty fast, he might have to tone that part down a bit with the team, and perhaps save the talk of tanning your balls and other quirks for another audience.  Other than that, I think he's pretty much the best candidate, with the highest ceiling.  If you're going to do this, you might as well rip off the band-aid and go for it.  Putting him as a bench coach is only going to be unfair to the next manager.

Therefore, I voted for Dusty Baker.

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#18 [url]

Oct 24 15 6:21 AM

Matthew wrote:
While I shared in everyone's frustration about Mattingly, sadly, a lot of the moves that he made that frustrated us to no end are probably done by about 90% of other MLB managers.  The problem isn't so much Mattingly in a vacuum, but the horrid philosophies that have permated baseball, particularly over the past 30 years, from the save, to LaRussa bullpen micromanagement.  Bring in a closer in a tie ballgame, instead of worrying about a save?  Most managers sadly leave their closer hanging; ask Fredi Gonzalez in the 2013 NLDS.  It's going to have to take a real gutsy guy, willing to free himself from some of the past, with the support of the FO, to really turn something like that on its heels.  

This is why I've come around to Kapler, lately.  Oddly, his inexperience is appealing in that he hasn't been indoctrinated with "the book" and how things are supposed to be done.  He wrote this article a couple of years ago that I thought was pretty good: http://www.foxsports.com/mlb/just-a-bit-outside/story/new-competitive-edge-in-baseball-091114

By all accounts, he's quite willing to F with the system and get really creative.  That's something I always felt was really Maddon's best quality.  I like Maddon, but I think he's overrated in the sense that people think he's this crazy genius.  Really, what makes Maddon great is that he's willing to get creative and make decisions that sometimes goes against what "the book" says.  Sometimes it works, a lot of times it doesn't, but it's that openness to ideas that's really his best strength.  He's, at the very least, curious, and that's a great thing to have in a manager, and I think Kapler has that.  I'm not trying to discount experience, it's quite valuable, but not if it's being experienced in making robotic, generic, crappy decisions.  Although, for better or worse, experience is something that's increasingly decreasing in importance, with the FO taking on larger roles in decisions.

Which brings me to the next point: whoever it is, the next Dodgers manager has to be on board with analytics.  But what I think is equally important, beyond having those tools, is being able to effectively communicate these philosophies to players and show why these tools are better, both for clubhouse cohesiveness and for the next manager not appearing as a puppet.  I think Kapler could be quite effective in that regard, having been a former player and, at one time, being on the other side of that debate.  After last year, he's also one of the few people who have really great, personal insights into the Seager's, and Schebler's of the world, something that will become more important as they and others continue to get promoted.

What actually scares me about Kapler is that, at times, he almost comes across as a parody.  The organic eating stuff is all well and good, and more power to him, but, unless he wants to piss off a clubhouse pretty fast, he might have to tone that part down a bit with the team, and perhaps save the talk of tanning your balls and other quirks for another audience.  Other than that, I think he's pretty much the best candidate, with the highest ceiling.  If you're going to do this, you might as well rip off the band-aid and go for it.  Putting him as a bench coach is only going to be unfair to the next manager.

Therefore, I voted for Dusty Baker.


Haha!

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#19 [url]

Oct 24 15 7:43 AM

Matthew wrote:
While I shared in everyone's frustration about Mattingly, sadly, a lot of the moves that he made that frustrated us to no end are probably done by about 90% of other MLB managers.  The problem isn't so much Mattingly in a vacuum, but the horrid philosophies that have permated baseball, particularly over the past 30 years, from the save, to LaRussa bullpen micromanagement.  Bring in a closer in a tie ballgame, instead of worrying about a save?  Most managers sadly leave their closer hanging; ask Fredi Gonzalez in the 2013 NLDS.  It's going to have to take a real gutsy guy, willing to free himself from some of the past, with the support of the FO, to really turn something like that on its heels.  

This is why I've come around to Kapler, lately.  Oddly, his inexperience is appealing in that he hasn't been indoctrinated with "the book" and how things are supposed to be done.  He wrote this article a couple of years ago that I thought was pretty good: http://www.foxsports.com/mlb/just-a-bit-outside/story/new-competitive-edge-in-baseball-091114

By all accounts, he's quite willing to F with the system and get really creative.  That's something I always felt was really Maddon's best quality.  I like Maddon, but I think he's overrated in the sense that people think he's this crazy genius.  Really, what makes Maddon great is that he's willing to get creative and make decisions that sometimes goes against what "the book" says.  Sometimes it works, a lot of times it doesn't, but it's that openness to ideas that's really his best strength.  He's, at the very least, curious, and that's a great thing to have in a manager, and I think Kapler has that.  I'm not trying to discount experience, it's quite valuable, but not if it's being experienced in making robotic, generic, crappy decisions.  Although, for better or worse, experience is something that's increasingly decreasing in importance, with the FO taking on larger roles in decisions.

Which brings me to the next point: whoever it is, the next Dodgers manager has to be on board with analytics.  But what I think is equally important, beyond having those tools, is being able to effectively communicate these philosophies to players and show why these tools are better, both for clubhouse cohesiveness and for the next manager not appearing as a puppet.  I think Kapler could be quite effective in that regard, having been a former player and, at one time, being on the other side of that debate.  After last year, he's also one of the few people who have really great, personal insights into the Seager's, and Schebler's of the world, something that will become more important as they and others continue to get promoted.

What actually scares me about Kapler is that, at times, he almost comes across as a parody.  The organic eating stuff is all well and good, and more power to him, but, unless he wants to piss off a clubhouse pretty fast, he might have to tone that part down a bit with the team, and perhaps save the talk of tanning your balls and other quirks for another audience.  Other than that, I think he's pretty much the best candidate, with the highest ceiling.  If you're going to do this, you might as well rip off the band-aid and go for it.  Putting him as a bench coach is only going to be unfair to the next manager.

Therefore, I voted for Dusty Baker.

If Dusty Baker (gag, choke, Heimlich) is our choice we best hurry, sounds like he aced his interview with the Nats.   According to the local news here in Miami, it is between him and Bud Black for the Nats' job.    They also reported that Mattingly will be contacted today or tomorrow for an interview (and hiring).   It was funny, the restaurant we had breakfast at in Little Havana, the waitress noticed my Dodger hat and she started to conversate on Yasiel Puig.   She says he used to come in to this restaurant a lot a year or so ago but not so much lately.   She hoped the Marlins could get him because he is a great tipper and really funny.   There were about six or seven pictures of him on the wall here and none of Stanton (don't know if that means anything).  

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#20 [url]

Oct 24 15 8:23 AM

Matthew wrote:
While I shared in everyone's frustration about Mattingly, sadly, a lot of the moves that he made that frustrated us to no end are probably done by about 90% of other MLB managers.  The problem isn't so much Mattingly in a vacuum, but the horrid philosophies that have permated baseball, particularly over the past 30 years, from the save, to LaRussa bullpen micromanagement.  Bring in a closer in a tie ballgame, instead of worrying about a save?  Most managers sadly leave their closer hanging; ask Fredi Gonzalez in the 2013 NLDS.  It's going to have to take a real gutsy guy, willing to free himself from some of the past, with the support of the FO, to really turn something like that on its heels.  

This is why I've come around to Kapler, lately.  Oddly, his inexperience is appealing in that he hasn't been indoctrinated with "the book" and how things are supposed to be done.  He wrote this article a couple of years ago that I thought was pretty good: http://www.foxsports.com/mlb/just-a-bit-outside/story/new-competitive-edge-in-baseball-091114

By all accounts, he's quite willing to F with the system and get really creative.  That's something I always felt was really Maddon's best quality.  I like Maddon, but I think he's overrated in the sense that people think he's this crazy genius.  Really, what makes Maddon great is that he's willing to get creative and make decisions that sometimes goes against what "the book" says.  Sometimes it works, a lot of times it doesn't, but it's that openness to ideas that's really his best strength.  He's, at the very least, curious, and that's a great thing to have in a manager, and I think Kapler has that.  I'm not trying to discount experience, it's quite valuable, but not if it's being experienced in making robotic, generic, crappy decisions.  Although, for better or worse, experience is something that's increasingly decreasing in importance, with the FO taking on larger roles in decisions.

Which brings me to the next point: whoever it is, the next Dodgers manager has to be on board with analytics.  But what I think is equally important, beyond having those tools, is being able to effectively communicate these philosophies to players and show why these tools are better, both for clubhouse cohesiveness and for the next manager not appearing as a puppet.  I think Kapler could be quite effective in that regard, having been a former player and, at one time, being on the other side of that debate.  After last year, he's also one of the few people who have really great, personal insights into the Seager's, and Schebler's of the world, something that will become more important as they and others continue to get promoted.

What actually scares me about Kapler is that, at times, he almost comes across as a parody.  The organic eating stuff is all well and good, and more power to him, but, unless he wants to piss off a clubhouse pretty fast, he might have to tone that part down a bit with the team, and perhaps save the talk of tanning your balls and other quirks for another audience.  Other than that, I think he's pretty much the best candidate, with the highest ceiling.  If you're going to do this, you might as well rip off the band-aid and go for it.  Putting him as a bench coach is only going to be unfair to the next manager.

Therefore, I voted for Dusty Baker.
Makes perfect sense.  Can I change my vote to Bobby Valentine?smiley: eek

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